GIY founder, Michael Kelly, and Head of Community Development, Karen O’Donohoe, take viewers on a journey from plot (or pot) to plate each week. Featuring a star vegetable, grown from seed to harvest and used to create a delicious meal that anyone at home can replicate. GROW COOK EAT is available to watch on RTE Player, Amazon Prime and our YouTube channel.

Season 3


Episode 1

Broad Beans: Broad beans are this year’s first crop to find a home in Grow HQ soil. This is an easy vegetable to grow, as long as you have a resident ladybird, a hose to keep the blackfly at bay, and a beer trap to distract any slugs for good measure.

as seen on RTÉ Player and Amazon Prime
Episode 2

Oriental Greens: Trusty heads of iceberg lettuce are set aside to make room for their exotic cousins – mizuna, rocket and mustard greens. Easy to grow in beds and perfect for containers, these cut-and-come-again greens can be harvested multiple times, making them the ideal beginners’ crop.

Episode 3

Cucumber: Mick is feeling cool as a cucumber with his well-rehearsed veg trivia, new polytunnels and boy scout knowledge of cucumber growing. While there’s more to it than the veg grown in earlier episodes, Karen shows how this prolific plant can also be grown outdoors in Container Corner, alongside some miniature cucumelons.

Episode 4

Broccoli: Karen attempts a world first by growing purple sprouting broccoli in a container. Michael puts her initial success down to good fortune and sure enough, trouble awaits.

Episode 5

Chard: Michael Kelly and Karen O’Donohoe have an easy run with this week’s star veg – robust and easy to grow, the colourful rainbow chard brings a prolific harvest. Katie Sanderson shows how equally simple it is to cook, wilting it on eggs for a quick and delicious breakfast.

Episode 6

Strawberry: The first fruit to receive the Grow Cook Eat treatment in this third series is everyone’s favourite Summer treat – the strawberry.

Episode 7

Celery & Celeriac: The final crop of series three is a double header. Karen agrees to grow celery despite her dislike of it, and also celeriac which she considers the ‘pug’ of the vegetable world – so ugly that it’s cute!

Season 2


Episode 1

Onions: In this first episode Michael and Karen focus on a household staple – the onion. Easy to grow and very low maintenance, both red and white varieties are sown in the raised bed with Karen holding back some of the sets for container growing.

Episode 2

Pumpkins: In this second episode, Michael and Karen take a fresh look at the pumpkin and why it’s a fantastic vegetable to grow, cook and eat during the year, rather than just buy, carve and dump at Halloween.

Episode 3

Sweetcorn: This week’s episode is all about the highs and lows of growing a more ambitious vegetable – in Michael and Karen’s case, sweetcorn, and all they can say is third time lucky!

Episode 4

Courgette: Halfway through the series and it’s time to introduce the courgette or as Michael Kelly calls it, ‘The Vegetable of Mass Production’! Easy to grow in beds and containers so long as it is given plenty of milk (you read that right!), one plant can produce up to 40 courgettes. No wonder growers love to give them as presents at harvest time!

Episode 5

Kale: Once a vegetable grown to feed cattle, but now a staple ingredient for juicers everywhere, Kale is the fifth vegetable to feature in this series. This highly nutritious vegetable thrives in both the raised bed and container – despite a pigeon attack that prompts Michael Kelly to cover each of the three varieties sown.

Episode 6

French Beans: Who knew French Beans were so easy to grow? Michael Kelly says French Beans are one of the most straightforward vegetables to grow – both the climbing green, and dwarf purple varieties, do really well in the glasshouse, raised bed and container.

Episode 7

Chilli Pepper: In this final programme of the second season, it’s all about the chili pepper, which is very hot, but also very easy to grow. Chef Katie Sanderson puts the presenters’ taste buds to the test with an Indian chilli pickle, tamarind sauce with yoghurt and poppadoms, and Karen O’Donohoe and Michael Kelly can just about stand the heat.

Season 1


Episode 2

Tomatoes: Unfortunately, most of the imported supermarket tomatoes we buy taste of absolutely nothing at all. It is not until you grow your own that you realise this! The homegrown tomato is a delectable treat, and while a little TLC is required to grow them, it’s worth the effort.

Episode 3

Garlic: Garlic is relatively easy to grow and stores extremely well. It’s also incredibly good for you. The garlic requirements of an average family can be easily satisfied by even the smallest vegetable patch, or container. Take any bulb of garlic, break out the cloves and stick them in to the ground spaced about 4 inches apart, and each clove will eventually turn in to a bulb of garlic.

Episode 4

Beetroot: Many people have an aversion to beetroot because the only way they have ever tasted it is boiled and drowned in vinegar! If this is your experience, it deserves a second chance as it is a fine root crop. Beetroot is easy to grow, can be eaten all year round as it stores well, is incredibly good for you, and has multiple uses. You can boil it, bake it, grate it into salads, chutneys, wine, cakes.

Episode 5

Carrots: Carrots require a deep, light, stone free, fertile soil to do well. But if you get the soil right, you will be rewarded with a crunchy, sweet and flavoursome crop which will store well. Two or three well-timed sowings of carrots should see you self-sufficient all year round in this classic stockpot vegetable which is full of vitamins.

Episode 6

Salads: Although it’s hard to beat the nostalgic crunch of a head of lettuce, most of us have come to expect much more from our salads than crunch. Today, a top notch salad contains many different colours, shapes, sizes, textures and fl
avours. As well as lettuces, it may also include the leaves of Arugula, Radicchio, Spinach, Cress, Mustards and Herb

Episode 7

Peas: For the final episode, hosts Karen O’Donohue and Michael Kelly are teaching us to produce peas. Why peas? Well, they are almost never available in the shops fresh, instead, they are usually frozen.